Reggio Calabria

The most beautiful kilometre in Italy

Considered the land of the charms and enchantments of D'Annunzio, which were very popular among 19th-century English travellers, Reggio Calabria stands out for its variety of unmissable works of art and pathways waiting to be explored.
 Not many people know that Reggio Calabria, in addition to being referred to as the City of the Bronzes, is also known as the City of the Fata Morgana because visitors can witness this peculiar optical phenomenon just off the coast of the city. As you look at the mirage, which can be seen within the narrow band above the horizon, the coast of Sicily appears to be just a few metres away from the shores of Calabria and the objects on the opposite shore are clearly distinguishable.
 
The name Fata Morgana is a reference to Morgana of Celtic mythology, who made sailors have visions of fantastic castles in the air or on land in order to entice them before leading them to their death.
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The captivating Lungomare Falcomatà is a veritable corner of paradise teeming with palm trees and exotic species in an atmosphere of intense aromas and colours. As your feet wander, you will be caressed by the sea breeze and enchanted by the panoramic views over the Strait.
 

This charming city is typically Mediterranean in style and has the irresistible allure of a tourist resort. The captivating Lungomare Falcomatà, named the most beautiful kilometre in Italy, is a veritable corner of paradise teeming with palm trees and exotic species in an atmosphere of intense aromas and colours. It forms the heart of the spring and summer tourist season and is also the centre of the city’s cultural scene. As your feet wander, you will be caressed by the sea breeze and enchanted by panoramic views over the Strait.
Nature and history, culture and traditions and entertainment and curiosity all harmoniously coexist in this beautiful setting. As you stroll through Via Marina you will notice the ruins of days gone by such as the Greek Walls and the Roman Baths. The National Archaeological Museum is located at the end of the promenade and houses the famous Bronzes of Riace as well as magnificent ancient artefacts from Prehistoric, Greek and Roman times. The Museum is well worth a visit on account of its important collection dating from prehistoric times to the time of Greek colonisation and its large display of Roman, Byzantine and medieval works of art.

 
Reggio Calabria
 

The heart of the old town is undoubtedly Corso Garibaldi which is home to many boutiques and Art Nouveau buildings as well as the magnificent Cilea Theatre, an imposing Cathedral, the Duomo, which is illuminated at night, and the Aragonese Castle. Along the so-called Greco-Roman, road you will find the Church of the Ottimati, the only Arab-Norman style church in the city, and the Church of the Greeks.
 Villa Genoese Zerbi, with its neo-Gothic Venetian style, features red brick facades, similar to those of the Venetian cà, which are adorned with Gothic arches, columns, decorative doorframes and balustrades. Until recently, the villa served as southern Italy’s exhibition venue for the Venice Biennial art exhibition and displayed Rabarama's three gigantic sculptures which  now permanently adorn the promenade.
At the end of this long avenue you will encounter the magnificent garden of the Villa Comunale, which is just a stone’s throw from the Experimental Station for Essences and Citrus Oils. This well-known research centre for the study of jasmine and bergamot is equipped with several research laboratories, a specialist library and the Bergamot Museum which displays historical pieces of equipment that were used to process this fragrant citrus fruit.
The area of Reggio Campi, connected to Via Marina by a series of picturesque staircases, forms a kind of balcony on the Strait from which you can enjoy panoramic views over the entire city. It is also the site of the magnificent Basilica of San Paolo alla Rotonda.
 Meanwhile, further north along Reggio Calabria’s coastline you will find the wonderful inlet of Scilla. This completely unique bay is home to Ruffo Castle, which can be found right next to the sea and overlooks the entire panorama. At the foot of the Castle lies the Marina Grande, an ethereal bay that never fails to enchant visitors.
However, the real pearl of Scilla is Chianalea, a fairy-tale village that seems to have risen from the water. At sunset, amidst the purple and orange tones of the sky, make sure you catch a glimpse of the Sicilian coast from the district of San Giorgio which overlooks Marina Grande.

 
Reggio Calabria
 

The city is dotted with several churches of great artistic value.
One such church is the modern Basilica of Santa Maria della Consolazione which is a popular destination for pilgrims on account of the painting of the Madonna della Consolazione, patron saint of Reggio Calabria, that decorates its interior. The Church of San Giorgio al Corso, also recently built, is dedicated to the fallen of the First World War. Its classical style facade is adorned with a depiction of Saint George killing the dragon.
The Church of San Paolo, on the other hand, has a Romanesque style facade and houses an impressive collection of mosaics portraying important episodes of the Gospel. In front of the Castle is the Church of the Ottimati which stands out thanks to its red Norman-Byzantine style dome, an emblem of the Spanish rule over Reggio Calabria. The church, in addition to displaying important works such as the 1597 painting of the Most Holy Virgin of the Annunciation and the painting of Saint Ignatius of Loyola, contains the most precious mosaic in the world. Created more than 1000 years ago from over 33 different types of marble, the mosaic portrays God in the centre, the evangelists in four surrounding circles and the Apostles in several other circles.
For lovers of the sea, Reggio Calabria’s best beach is undoubtedly the city Lido, which is beautifully landscaped with palm trees. It is located at the Rada dei Giunchi to the north of the old town and overlooks the Strait of Messina.
Visitors to Reggio Calabria are strongly advised to explore the Grotta Perciata coves as well as the Calette della Sirene (Coves of the Mermaid) and the Calette delle Rondini (Coves of the Swallows). The beaches of Bova Marina and Melito Porto Salvo on the region’s east coast are also well worth the detour.

 
National Archaeological Museum

The National Archaeological Museum of Reggio Calabria has been recognised as one of the most prestigious archaeological museum institutes in Italy and was granted autonomy following the 2014 MiBACT Reform.
The building that houses the museum was one of the first in Italy to be designed exclusively for that purpose and is named after Marcello Piacentini, one of the greatest figures in early twentieth century architecture. Piacentini actually designed the building itself, and constructed it in a modern style, drawing inspiration from the main European museums he had visited.
Located in the heart of the city, the Museum was created by combining the State Museum with the Civic Museum of Reggio Calabria. The latter opened on 18 June 1882 and displayed numerous archaeological finds from the region.
The Museum has four exhibition floors, plus a terrace and an area for temporary exhibitions.
On the ground floor visitors are welcomed by the Bronzes of Riace, the symbol of Reggio Calabria, and the Porticello Bronzes. The room in which the statues are displayed maintains a constant temperature in order to preserve the various artefacts.
On the mezzanine floor, visitors can step into the shoes of the inhabitants of Magna Graecia as they discover utensils and everyday objects from the era. They can also admire the region’s traditional clothing, decorative mosaics and everything related to the funerary customs of the time, such as the magnificent amphorae in traditional black and red chrome.
Touch screen monitors among the various displays provide further information and 3D reconstructions of the houses, scenarios and environments from which the artefacts originate, allowing visitors to fully immerse themselves in the experience.
The first floor contains everything relating to the cities and sanctuaries of Magna Graecia as well as numerous objects of worship such as statuettes, jars, engraved stones and architectural fragments from the various temples found in the region’s sacred areas. The highlights of this section are the Pinakes (terracotta tablets) displaying scenes in relief which tell the tales of culturally important historical events.
The second floor displays an exhibition of the prehistoric era, from the Stone Age to the Metal Ages, providing an insight into the economic and social transformations of the time. Among the finds on display are objects from the Macchiabate necropolis, men’s and women’s ornaments and utensils, weapons, amphorae and polished stones. But perhaps the most impressive artefacts are the animal and human skeletons and an impressive engraving of an ox on a rock.
The Museum's basement is highly atmospheric with its bluish light that illuminates the room. There you can admire various naval artefacts, including the remains of boats and numerous amphorae recovered from the seabed.
The terrace is the perfect vantage point from which to admire the natural beauty of the Strait in all its splendour.

 
Reggio Calabria
 
Aragonese Castle

The Castle is the city’s main fortification and stands in the square of the same name. Passed from the Byzantines to the Normans in 1059, and then to Charles I of Anjou in 1266, the fortress has undergone numerous restorations and modifications over the centuries in order to adapt to the evolution of siege engines and artillery.
It was King Ferrante who, in 1458, had two crenellated towers and the moat added, while, in 1539, Peter of Toledo increased its capacity so that it could shelter the inhabitants of Reggio from the Turkish invasions.
Converted into barracks at the time of Ferdinand I, the Aragonese castle was transformed, during the Risorgimento, into a political prison and a place of execution for the rebels.
In the aftermath of the earthquake of 1908, the option of saving the bastion but demolishing the building, which had been left badly damaged, was considered. And so, the decision was made to demolish nine tenths of the fortress forever.
Home to the observatory of the National Institute of Geophysics until 1986, the building currently hosts exhibitions and cultural events.

 
Reggio Calabria
 
Cathedral of Most Holy Mary of the Assumption

The largest religious building in Calabria is located in Piazza Duomo, in the city’s historic centre.
The Cathedral dates back to the beginning of the second millennium when, following the Norman invasion of southern Italy, the city underwent a process of Latinisation with the consequent abandonment of the Greek-Byzantine rituals.
The centre of the imposing facade features a triforate window surmounted by a rose window and three bronze portals. The statues of Saint Paul and Saint Stephen of Nicaea, sculpted by Francesco Jerace, dominate the churchyard.
Upon entering the building, which is illuminated by large polychrome windows, visitors encounter a basilica with three naves divided by three transepts and rows of marble columns.
Of great artistic interest is the Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, the most important monument of baroque and 17th century art in the archdiocese of Reggio Emilia, which has been declared a national monument.  

 
Reggio Calabria
 
Civic Art Gallery

Opened on 26 May 2008 in a wing of the Francesco Cilea Municipal Theatre, the Pinacoteca Civica contains some of the most prestigious works of Reggio Calabria’s artistic heritage. The pieces on display date back to between the fifteenth and twentieth century.
Inside you will find the collections of the former Civic Museum as well as several state-owned works such as The return of the prodigal son by Mattia Preti. Also on display are famous works by Luca Giordano and Antonello da Messina, such as Penitent Saint Jerome. You will also find several creations of Lavagna Fieschi and Enrico Salfi, Jerace, Rodriguez, Covelli and the Reggio Emilia natives Cannizzaro and Benassai. The section dedicated to the 20th century features a painting by Renato Guttuso depicting swordfish fishermen. 

 
Diocesan Museum “Mons. Aurelio Sorrentino”

The Museum is located on the ground floor of the late 18th-century Archbishop's Palace which was built next to the Cathedral of Maria Santissima dell’Assunta.
Among the works on display the most noteworthy are The Resurrection of Lazarus by Neapolitan painter Francesco De Mura, a pupil of Francesco Solimena; the Radiating Monstrance designed by Polistena native Francesco Jerace for the occasion of the Regional Eucharistic Congress held in Reggio Calabria; the silver and enamel Pastoral Baculus of Monsignor Antonio de Ricci, Archbishop of Reggio from 1453 to 1490, from the Neapolitan school; an ivory Crucifix donated to the Cathedral by Archbishop Alessandro Tommasini; a precious French Chalice in silver and painted ceramic, donated in 1879 by the Queen of Spain, Maria Cristina, to Cardinal Luigi Tripepi; valuable textile artefacts that belonged to the Confraternity of the Immaculate in the Church of the Santissima Annunziata including a refined silk brocade drape made in Lyon during the second quarter of the 18th century; and, last but not least, two silver crowns dating back to 1614 which originally belonged to the Renaissance marble bust of the Madonna and Child that was housed in the Co-cathedral of the Madonna Isodia in Bova.

 
Planetarium

The Pythagoras Planetarium, a structure owned by the Metropolitan City of Reggio Calabria, was opened on 12 March 20104.
It displays reproductions of almost all the astronomical phenomena, which can be observed both during the day and at night and at all latitudes. But perhaps its most impressive feature is its ability to display these phenomena accelerated in time thanks to a device that projects the image and the movements of the celestial vault as they would appear to an observer in an instant and in a specific place.
Thanks to the construction of the Planetarium which, for its size and thanks to the beauty of its external Geode, is one of the most beautiful in Europe, the Metropolitan City of Reggio Calabria is one of few European cities that has at its disposal this spectacular and effective tool for teaching and disseminating scientific disciplines.

 
Gastronomy

Perhaps even more so than other regional Italian cuisine, that of Reggio Calabria is closely tied to religious and spiritual life and various rules and customs that are often linked to important events in the region’s 3,000 year history, from the Magna Graecian era to the Unification of Italy.
At Christmas and Epiphany, it is customary to eat a thirteen course meal, whereas at Carnival, macaroni and pork are the traditional dishes.
Easter is celebrated with roast lamb and religious breads.
The customs of today remain firmly rooted in ancient traditions. In fact, the area’s cuisine, consisting of the traditional dishes from the various cultures of its inhabitants, has changed very little over the years.
Preserved foods such as anchovies, pork sausages, cheeses, vegetables in oil and dried tomatoes, which allowed the local population to survive in times of famine and during the long periods of occupation by Turkish pirates, form an important part of the staple diet.

 


 


Address Palazzo San Giorgio - Piazza Italia, 1
  89125 - Reggio Calabria (RC)
Phone number 0965 3622111
Fax -
Website Comune di Reggio Calabria
 

 

National Archaeological Museum of Reggio Calabria

The National Archaeological Museum of Reggio Calabria has been recognised as one of the most prestigious archaeological museum institutes in Italy and was granted autonomy following the 2014 MiBACT Reform.
It was established with the support of famous Italian archaeologist Paolo Orsi and went on to become one of the most important museums in Italy thanks to the sheer number of Magna Graecian artefacts on display.
The building that houses the museum was one of the first in Italy built specifically for that purpose and was named after Marcello Piacentini, one of the greatest 20th century architects. Piacentini designed the building itself, giving it a modern style and drawing inspiration from the main European museums he had visited.
Located in the heart of the town, the Museum is an important part of the cityscape and life of the locals. On one side, it overlooks the central Piazza De Nava whereas, on the other, it faces the Falcomatà seafront and offers a wonderful view over the Strait.

Partially opened to the public in 1954, and officially opened in 1959, the Museum has undergone major transformations over the years. In 1981, the underwater archaeology section was rearranged to give adequate exposure to the Riace Bronzes, which are considered among the most important masterpieces of Greek art in the world.
The main feature of the current museum space is the new inner courtyard which is covered by a transparent glass ceiling and supported by a state-of-the-art technological structure. The atrium is flooded with light thanks to this clever engineering.

The Museum features four exhibition floors, plus a terrace and a space for temporary exhibitions.
 On the ground floor visitors are welcomed by the Riace Bronzes, the true symbol of Reggio Calabria, and the Bronzes of Porticello. The room in which the statues are displayed maintains a constant temperature in order to preserve the various artefacts.
On the mezzanine floor, visitors can step into the shoes of the inhabitants of Magna Graecia as they discover utensils and everyday objects from the era. They can also admire the region’s traditional clothing, decorative mosaics and everything related to the funerary customs of the time, such as the magnificent amphorae in traditional black and red chrome.
Touch screen monitors among the various displays provide further information and 3D reconstructions of the houses, scenarios and environments from which the artefacts originate, allowing visitors to fully immerse themselves in the experience.

 The first floor contains everything relating to the cities and sanctuaries of Magna Graecia as well as numerous objects of worship such as statuettes, jars, engraved stones and architectural fragments from the various temples found in the region’s sacred areas. The highlights of this section are the Pinakes (terracotta tablets) displaying scenes in relief which tell the tales of culturally important historical events.
The second floor displays an exhibition of the prehistoric era, from the Stone Age to the Metal Ages, providing an insight into the economic and social transformations of the time. Among the finds on display are objects from the Macchiabate necropolis, men’s and women’s ornaments and utensils, weapons, amphorae and polished stones. But perhaps the most impressive artefacts are the animal and human skeletons and an impressive engraving of an ox on a rock.
 The Museum's basement is highly atmospheric with its bluish light that illuminates the room. There you can admire various naval artefacts, including the remains of boats and numerous amphorae recovered from the seabed.

The terrace is the perfect vantage point from which to admire the natural beauty of the Strait in all its splendour.

The Riace Bronzes
The Riace Bronzes, considered among the most important examples of classical Greek art, are two bronze statues of two naked men originally armed with shields and spears, which have become the symbol of the city of Reggio Calabria.
The Bronzes were found in 1972 at the bottom of the Ionian sea near the coast of Riace Marina when they were spotted by a diving enthusiast. Luckily, they were only about 200 metres from the coast and just 8 metres deep and were in an excellent state of preservation.
The Bronzes most likely date back to the middle of the 5th century BC and it is thought that they were either thrown into the sea during a storm to lighten the ship’s load or that the ship itself sank, taking the statues with it.
The Bronzes are 1.98 and 1.97 metres tall and weigh 160 kg. The statues are of two completely naked men with beards and curly hair, bent left arms, and right arms that lie straight by their sides. They both wore helmets, held a spear or sword in their right hand and a shield in their left hands. However, these parts were removed from the statues before they were transported so that they could lie flat on their backs during the journey. They were originally anchored to their base thanks to a casting of molten lead which flowed both inside the feet and in the space in the base itself. Once solidified, the lead took the shape of the tenons that the restorers had to remove to penetrate the statue.

The Hellenistic Necropolis
In 1932, as the National Archaeological Museum of Reggio Calabria was being constructed, a necropolis relating to the Hellenistic town of Rhegion was discovered. The large burial ground is thought to have extended over what is now Piazza de Nava and was connected to another funerary area located in the nearby district of Santa Lucia, near Via Veneto. The necropolis contained around 100 graves with various different features. From the simple ustrina (the remains of funeral pyres) used for burials in stone “boxes” to more elaborate tombs such as brick chambers with barrel vaults or tiled roofs.
The necropolis is dated between the 4th and 2nd century BC, but the presence of older materials suggests that the area had been used for the same purpose since the classical age. Some finds from the burial grounds are on display in the new exhibition (level E).

The lapidary
The objects making up the lapidary are part of a collection donated by the Civic Museum of Reggio Calabria to which the findings of numerous archaeological excavations carried out in the area were later added. The section, located on level E, displays monumental inscriptions, marble bases and numerous architectural and decorative elements dating back to various periods. Visitors can also admire capitals and columns belonging to different buildings of the Greek and Roman cities of Calabria.

Kouros of Rhegion
In the entrance hall of the exhibition area, the Kouros of Rhegion, a splendid white marble statue from Paros dating back to 4 BC, has been placed on a wooden pedestal. The Kouros was unexpectedly found in the office of a wealthy businessman who used it as a lampshade. Confiscated by the State, it is now one of the greatest examples of marble sculpture from the Archaic period.

Head of the Philosopher of Porticello
The artefacts found among the cargo of a shipwrecked freight ship on the seabed of Porticello are also of great importance. The ship’s entire cargo dates back to the 5th century BC and included various beautiful bronze statues and a mysterious bronze Philosopher's Head which has been the subject of several important studies.

Locrian Mirrors and Tables
The Museum houses the Locrian Bronze Mirrors from the 6th century BC; the Locrian Tables from the archives of the Sanctuary of Zeus Olympius; Pinakes, terracotta votive tablets with bas-relief images dating back to the 3rd century BC; and the beautiful Group of the Dioscuri, marble statuettes from the pediment of a temple in the Marasà district.

Reggio Calabria is a treasure chest full of precious places that are worth a visit: the magnificent villa Genovese-Zerbi (1925) is similar to the 16th-century Venetian houses, with Gothic arches; Palazzo Spinelli, built in 1920, has a wonderful wrought-iron gate and houses the University Head Offices; the splendid Palazzo Guarna (1921) has Classic-style features. Corso Garibaldi runs parallel to the promenade, and it is always crowded and lined with fashionable shops. Gianni Versace, the renowned Calabrian fashion designer, was from Reggio Calabria, and his fortune began in his mother’s sewing business that was located in Via Tommaso Gullì 13, where his talent and passion manifested themselves. He left Reggio for Milan and conquered the international market. Despite his success, the great stylist never forgot his origins which inspired his collections: styles and colors reproduce the features of the Mediterranean culture. Those who love noisy and picturesque places have to visit the Piazza del Popolo street market, where the common practice is to bargain for the best price. Those who love 20th-century art, will be glad to know that the birthplace of the Futurist artist Umberto Boccioni stands in Via Cavour 41. Common elements of his artworks are the oblique perspective and above view. A whirling and uncontrollable movement characterizes his works; following his Futuristic concept, life continuously flows so that it is impossible to isolate an object from its context. A visit to the Reggio landmarks is like a rendez-vous with art history; the clear and bright Duomo, built in a gothic style; the ruined castle (two mighty towers and rests of the city walls); the Church of the Ottimati, of Medieval origin but remodeled in the 18th-century, that keeps columns and parts of a floor mosaic belonging to the ancient building; the Municipal Theater dedicated to Francesco Cilea, the great Calabrian musician. It faces Palazzo San Giorgio and it is bordered by Corso Garibaldi on the West, Via Cattolica dei Greci on the South, Via del Torrione on the East and Via Osanna on the North. It can sit 1500 people and is the largest theater in Calabria. Those who love astronomy can visit the Provincial Planetarium. The starry vault is reproduced by casting the images of stars and celestial bodies on a hemispheric screen above the viewers. Generally speaking, the term planetarium refers to the entire building that houses the projection apparatus and the dome. The external dome of the Planetarium geode has a 12 m diameter. The entire structure (both the shell and its external covering) is made in stainless steel. Inner seats are 70. The inner dome is made in stainless steel as well and it has a diameter of 8 m. 3200 stars are positioned in the 440 mm inner sphere.

The port of Reggio, and Villa San Giovanni as well, are important maritime hubs that connect Sicily to Calabria, through scheduled services with Messina and the Aeolian Islands. Along the Reggio Calabria-Messina route, the passenger traffic is carried by fast ships, while commercial vehicle transport by private ferry-boats. The port will enjoy a sea metro service for fast passenger transport between the cities of the Strait (Messina, Reggio Calabria and Villa S.Giovanni). Reggio is also connected to Malta through ferry-boats that carry people and vehicles twice a week. The Port of Reggio is not only for passenger and commercial traffic, but also for pleasure craft. The port area houses a touristic dock with 48 moorings. The port area is directly connected to roads and highway (direct interchange to Highway A3). The port of Reggio consists of an artificial harbor protected on the east by a N-S wharf. A touristic dock for pleasure craft is located North-East of the entrance.

Reggio Calabria castle was subjected to remodeling, enlargement, demolition, collapse (due to man, time and nature) that deeply altered its original shape. Byzantine and Norman defensive structures probably were erected on the hill where the castle stands, and, as claimed by some scholars, they were partially included in the fortress built under the Swabian rule. During the Aragon period, the castle was enlarged and fortified on the hill sides to resist Turk attacks and Charles VIII’s menaced invasion. The following structures date back to the Aragon period: two strong round towers on the south side (still visible), moats and, on the north-eastern side, the ravelin that was then destroyed by the earthquake in 1908. The castle maintained its 15th-century characteristics till early 19th century, when it was converted into barracks. In this period, the castle was remodeled, some rooms were demolished and adapted to the new use. The violent earthquake of 1908 partially destroyed fortification and deleted the original shape forever.

The National Museum of Reggio Calabria is one of the most prestigious archaeological museums in Italy, since it houses a great number of remarkable evidences of the Magna-Graecia colonies in Calabria. The Museum building overlooks the central De Nava Square and is located near the entrance of the promenade «I. Falcomatà». It was designed, one of the first cases in Italy, expressly to house a museum. The designer was Marcello Piacentini, one of the most renowned architects of the fascist period, that designed the modern building after he visited the main European museums. The creation of a National Museum was suggested by the sovrintendente Paolo Orsi who wanted to keep together the objects from the City Museum, that existed since 1882, and the artifacts from excavations campaigns he carried out in Calabria. The Museum was opened in 1959 and it has greatly changed over time. In 1981 the area dedicated to underwater archaeology was opened to properly house the world renowned Riace Bronzes found in 1972. Moreover, the second-floor area was arranged and dedicated to the Magna Graecia colonies. The exhibition itinerary starts from the ground floor, with a Section dedicated to Pre-history and Proto-history that retraces the history of Calabria from the appearance of man till the Iron Age, that is the period when Greeks arrived to Calabria and permanently settled in the colonies. The Pre-historic section keeps decorated vases, grave goods and bronze objects. The following section is dedicated to Epizephyrian Locris, one of the most flourishing and studied colonies. The evidences from excavations carried out in the ancient and dynamic Magna Graecia cities in Calabria are exhibited here. The area dedicated to Locris keeps an extraordinary collection of pinakes (5th century B.C.), clay votive tablets, dedicated to the Goddess Persephone to ask her protection for wedding knots. The section also houses the Cavaliere of Marafioti (a terracotta sculpture), a temple’s trabeation with animal heads and a fronton with the Dioscuri group; black-figure vases, terracotta small statues, female heads, small altars (objects used in worships and related rituals) and polychrome relief plate. The Magna Graecia Section keeps Greek colony artifacts mainly found in Calabria sacred areas and necropoles. They include epigraphs and gold and silver coins. The Medieval Byzantine and Modern Art Section houses, among other artworks, two small boards painted by Antonello da Messina, one of the main Italian 15th-century painters, and Il ritorno del figliol prodigo (The Return of the Prodigal Son) by the Calabrian Mattia Preti, one of the most important 17th-century Italian painters. The most fascinating Section is without doubt the one dedicated to Underwater Archaeology. It includes an ancient ship sank between the 5th and 4th centuries B.C., several amphoras found in the Calabrian sea, the Ritratto del Filosofo (The Portrait of a Philosopher) but, above all, the celebrated Riace Bronzes, two magnificent warriors dating to the 5th century B.C.; in making them, the artist followed the Classical Greek ideals of perfection. The Underwater Archaeological Section is located in the Museum basement. The first floor houses the Numismatic Section and findings from the main ancient Calabrian cities: Metauros, Medma and Hipponion, Kaulonia, Cirò, Laos and Temesa. A Picture Gallery that belonged to the City Museum was kept at the second floor; it was recently moved to a dedicated area at the Reggio Municipal Theater.



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